North Shore Bell's Trailhead to Cougar Lookout and back

Looking North by Northwest from Bell's Cross on top of the Big Hill. As can be seen, there isn't much color this time of year.
User: MikeHikes - 12/1/2018

Location: San Angelo State Park

Rating:
Difficulty:  Solitude:
Miles Hiked: 9.60 Miles  Elapsed Time: 4 hours

Comments:

Out      Bell's Trailhead > service road (S) > Dinosaur Trail > Dinosaur Tracks Viewing Area > Dinosaur Trail > Upper Big Hill > Badlands > River Bend > service road (NE) < Cougar Lookout       6.0 miles

Return  Cougar Lookout > Javalina > River Bend (100 meters straight to service road) > service road (ENE) > Lower Ghost Camp Trail > River Bend Ghost Camp > Lower Ghost Camp > South Slick Rock > service road (NW) > Scenic Loop > service road (NW) > Shady Trail > Bell's Trailhead     3.6 miles

Temps started in the low-50's, ended in the mid-60's. Sunny with strong and steady, westerly winds of 20+ mph.

Fairly easy hike along easy to see and traverse dry trails with little to no, vegetation covering them.  With the strong winds, most of the birds either stayed low to the ground or, conversely, high in the sky riding the currents.  Numerous small birds stayed in the scrub so photos were nearly impossible.  On the other hand, I saw a couple of raptors and vultures high in the sky, riding the wind currents as they looked for food. 

Most of the leaves have fallen so the landscape is colorless, except for the cacti, junipers and a few live oaks. 

NOTES

Water is available at the campground area by Bell's Trailhead.

Water, shade and info kiosk available at the Dinosaur Tracks Viewing Area.

Shade, info kiosk and bicycle repair station available at Cougar Lookout.

Water, shade, info kiosk and dry toilets available at River Bend Ghost Camp.

 

 



Log Photos
Not a lot of Color
Area around San Angelo State Park
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