Lone Star Hiking Trail - Four Notch Section

Trail
9.20 Miles
N/A
Free
3point5stars (3.88)4
2stars (2.38)
2stars (2.25)
No
No
Yes
N/A
New Waverly
Montgomery
More Info
Photos
Big Woods Section Trailhead
This is the trailhead at the start of the Big Woods Section. It is at the corner of FS 207 and FS 202. (Photo by Lone_Star)
The Road Walk
This is the long (and boring) road walk along FS 207. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Big Woods Ranch
This huge ranch is on FS 207. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Huntsville Compressor Plant
This is a natural gas compressor plant along FS 207. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Junction Of FS 200 and FS 207
The trail turns right onto FS 207 here. If you look closely, you can see the trail marker on the telephone pole. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Start Of The Road Walk
Here is where the LSHT joins the dirt road (FS 200) near mile marker 52. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Massive Spider Webs
I am always amazed at the skill and intelligence of living things. This spider web was about the size of my head. (Photo by Lone_Star)
A Little Rough
The vegetation along the trail between mile markers 51 and 52 was a little overgrown and a few fallen trees covered the trail. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Briar Creek
This small, wooden bridge spans Briar Creek near mile marker 50. A fallen tree almost took it out. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Trail Obscured
In several sections, the trail is hard to see. Pay attention to the tree markers as they will lead the way. Can you see the trail in this photo? Hint: It heads off to the right. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Pond
There is a small pond along the trail near mile marker 52. (Photo by Lone_Star)
Trailhead
This is the trailhead at FS 200. (Photo by Lone_Star)

Only showing last 12 photos. View All Photos

Log Entries
Rest Of Four Notch
By Lone_Star on 3/22/2013
Rating: 2point5stars Difficulty: 2point5stars Solitude: 2stars
Distance: 10.20 Miles Duration: 4 hours, 45 minutes

This is my second (Day #2) log of the Lone Star Hiking Trail - Four Notch Section.  This log covers the remainder of Lone Star Hiking Trail (LSHT) from the junction of the LSHT and the Four Notch Loop Trail between mile markers 49 and 50 all the way to the where dirt roads FS 207 and FS 202 meet (mile mark 54.2).

After camping overnight, I parked my car along the road where the LSHT meets FS 200 near mile marker 52.  I hiked NW to the junction (described above) and back (I'll call this Leg #1) then to the end of the trail and back (Leg #2).

Leg #1 was similar to, but not as nice, as the trail I hiked the day before.  It had some rolling hills, a nice pond, but it was not as scenic and the trail was not maintained as well.  The vegetation had overgrown quite a bit and required a little bit of bushwhacking.  Had it not been for the excellent trail markers on the trees, the trail path was not easily visible due to the large number of dead leaves that had fallen.  I had to pause at a few points to find the trail because experience has taught me that sometimes when the path gets thick and rough it could be a sign you've wandered off the beaten path.  In this case, I didn't wander off the trail, it just wasn't a beaten path!  My impression was that this part of the Four Notch Section was not hiked nearly as much as the Loop.

Leg #2 was a whole different (and less enjoyable) experience.  It is known as the road walk because the LSHT goes along a couple of dirt roads for a few miles since private property cuts off the nature trail.  Frankly, I found the road walk long and boring.  You do pass by the Huntsville Compressor Station (natural gas) and the Big Woods Ranch, but otherwise it's just a long dirt road.  It was nice (and very tempting) to see the trailhead of the Big Woods Section at the corner of FS 207 and FS 202, but unfortunately that section is closed at the present time due to a large number of fallen trees.  I can't wait 'til they open it back up - just the name sounds exciting.

It was nice to finish up the Four Notch section, but I was only impressed with the loop I hiked the day before.  The road walk is simply necessary to get you to the Big Woods section.

Simply Awesome!
By Lone_Star on 3/21/2013
Rating: 4stars Difficulty: 3stars Solitude: 4stars
Distance: 8.95 Miles Duration: 4 hours, 15 minutes

This is the first of my two logs of the Lone Star Hiking Trail - Four Notch Section.  I camped overnight and took two days to hike it in its entirety.  This Day #1 log will cover the Four Notch Loop only.

The Lone Star Hiking Trail (LSHT) has been called one of "Texas' best kept secrets" and it is my opinion that the Four Notch section is one of the nicest parts.  I haven't hiked the entire LSHT yet (and I may not be able to for awhile since several sections have been closed by the U.S. Forestry Service due to fallen trees), only the Wilderness, Winters Bayou, and Tarkington Bayou sections, but I enjoyed the Four Notch section the most thus far.

I parked at Trailhead #8 on FS 213, just a hundred yards or so off Four Notch Road.  When I reached the junction of the LSHT and the Four Notch Loop Trail (FNLT), I turned left (north) onto the FNLT.  Overall, the trail was well maintained and extremely scenic.  It consisted of several rolling hills, lots of creek crossings; large, tall wooded areas that contained some MASSIVE long leaf pine trees that were easily 3' in a diameter at the base; dogwood trees in full bloom; and a couple of snakes to keep it interesting.  I hiked during the week and had the entire trail to myself for both days.

I highly recommend this hike.  I enjoyed the FNLT very much and did it at a very leisurely pace so I could take lots of photos.

By Eveline on 4/4/1998
Rating: 4stars Difficulty: 2stars Solitude: 2stars
Distance: 7.40 Miles Duration: N/A
By Eveline on 4/3/1998
Rating: 5stars Difficulty: 2stars Solitude: 1star
Distance: 6.20 Miles Duration: N/A
We did an easy out and back. Had a few creek crossings. Very enjoyable place to hike.
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